Current Projects

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Oregon Problem Gambling Year 2

Wed August 9th, 2017

The Center for Health and Safety Culture will be working with the Oregon Health Authority- Public Health Division to continue its efforts in OR to reduce problem gambling by utilizing the 7 Communication Steps of the Positive Culture Framework to lay a foundation for which a communications campaign can be developed.

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Understanding Law Enforcement Support for Traffic Safety

Wed August 9th, 2017

The Center for Health and Safety Culture at Montana State University will be conducting a comparative case study to better understand law enforcement’s attitudes and beliefs about traffic safety. This research project is a part of the Traffic Safety Culture Transportation Pooled Fund and will examine the differences between agencies in two rural and two urban states. The researchers will conduct both qualitative and quantitative analysis to provide a deeper understanding of the cases involved. The project findings will be based on the analysis of self-reported responses to a survey and augmented by interviews of law enforcement leaders. The Center will make recommendations about methods to increase engagement in traffic safety efforts based on beliefs identified in the study.

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Survey of Culture Amongst Groups of Different Transportation Mode Users to Promote Safe Inter- Model Interactions

Wed August 9th, 2017

The Center for Health and Safety Culture will design and implement a survey in Bozeman, MT and Fargo, ND to characterize the traffic safety culture of groups defined by a preferred mode of transportation regarding behavior interactions with other modes that can increase conflicts affecting mode safety. Basic analysis will produce individual summary reports of key results with recommendations for strategies to increase support and engagement in alternative commuting modes. This work is funded by the US Federal Highway Administration.

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Clackamas County Drive to Zero Program

Mon December 5th, 2016

This project seeks to cultivate a positive transportation safety culture to reduce fatalities and serious injuries among those in the Molalla, Oregon region. This project collaborates with the Clackamas County Drive to Zero Program to engage existing stakeholders and recruit partners in a community-wide process focusing on the community of Molalla. The project seeks to apply the Positive Culture Framework in partnership with the Molalla Communities that Care organization to improve transportation safety. Initial steps include: building local capacity in the Positive Culture Framework; reviewing and prioritizing local transportation safety data; mapping existing relevant strategies within Molalla; collecting additional data to better understand the local culture relating to the prioritized transportation safety issue; and identifying and planning potential strategies based on the comprehensive assessment.

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Idaho Transportation Department Distracted Driving

Mon November 21st, 2016

The Idaho Transportation Department and the Center for Health and Safety Culture are engaged in a project to address distracted driving in Idaho. This project seeks to improve traffic safety and reduce injuries and fatal car crashes by utilizing the Positive Culture Framework across the social ecology to transform driving culture.  Throughout this multi-year project, the Center will provide trainings on the PCF framework, develop and implement baseline surveys to measure existing positive norms, perceived norms, and critical gaps regarding distracted driving.  The Center will develop and implement efforts focused on workplaces, high schools, and general adults across the state.

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Applying Traffic Safety Culture in Minnesota

Wed August 9th, 2017

In partnership with the Minnesota Department of Transportation, the Center for Health and Safety Culture and CHI St. Joseph's Health are engaged in a project to understand how culture impacts traffic safety behavior in a Park Rapids, Minnesota while creating common language, common understanding, and a portfolio of strategies to positively impact traffic safety culture. This multi-year project is divided into three phases 1. Establish community partnerships, 2. Develop traffic safety culture strategies, and 3. Implement traffic safety strategies. Throughout this project, the Center will provide training on the Positive Culture Framework, develop and implement surveys to assess values, attitudes, beliefs, and behaviors regarding prioritized traffic safety issues, develop a toolkit of traffic safety culture strategies, and implement selected strategies across the social ecology including adults, students, workplaces, and law enforcement in Park Rapids, Minnesota.  

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Traffic Safety Culture Pooled Fund Project: An assessment of traffic safety culture related to driving after cannabis use

Fri August 4th, 2017

The Center for Health Safety Culture engaged in a research project with the Traffic Safety Culture Pooled Fund to better understand the cultural factors associated with driving under the influence of cannabis. An important risk factor in traffic safety is use of drugs that impair driver perception, decision-making, and skill.  Cannabis has been shown to impair driver ability, and its use is on the increase. Several states have legalized recreational cannabis use, and more are considering legalization. Increased use of cannabis among drivers may pose a barrier to achieving a zero deaths strategy. Therefore, understanding the cultural factors that influence driving under the influence of cannabis is critical in addressing this problem.

The Center developed, implemented, and analyzed surveys to better understand the cultural factors that influence driving after using cannabis. Recommendations based on the analyses will inform potential interventions and policy decisions about this timely issue.

For more information, visit MDT Transportation Pooled Fund Traffic Safety Culture. Final reports for this project can be found at www.mdt.mt.gov/research/projects/cannabis-use.shtml.

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