Upcoming Webinars

Webinar Archives

View most current webinars below. See our YouTube channel for a complete archive of webinars.

Date: Dec 8, 2021 at 1 pm PT, 2 pm MT , 3 pm CT, 4 PM ET

Panelists: Jay Otto, Jubaer Ahmed

Motor vehicle crashes are a significant public health concern. Drivers engage in dangerous driving for various reasons, including long driving, fatigue, and distracted or impaired driving. In addition, many psychological factors, such as personality traits and emotions, have been found to be contributing factors to dangerous driving behaviors. Emotional intelligence, a new concept in the driving context, can help to understand different social emotional components related to driving behaviors. Emotional intelligence can be described as understanding and differentiating between emotions and using this information to then guide thoughts and thus behaviors. During this webinar, Jubaer Ahmed, a PhD student at the Center for Health and Safety Culture, will review his development of a scale to assess emotional intelligence in the driving context.

To reach Vision Zero, traffic safety organizations may need to examine their approach and change their culture. An example of this is recognizing how road user culture influences road user behavior. From this perspective, organizations seeking to improve traffic safety will need to develop strategies that change road user behavior.  In this video, Nic Ward, the Director of the Center for Health and Safety Culture interviews members of the Washington Traffic Safety Commission (WTSC) about their experience in working with the center to examine and change their approach to traffic safety in support of their Vision Zero goal. This changed involved thinking about road user behavior in terms of the influence of “traffic safety culture”. In particular, WTSC wanted to adopt a Proactive Traffic Safety approach that focuses on positive aspects of road user culture that can help support safer behaviors. To provide a framework for applying this approach to the development and evaluation of culture-based traffic safety strategies, WTSC also began using the Positive Culture Framework to guide their decision-making process of working with communities. Please watch these videos on the Proactive Traffic Safety approach and the Positive Culture Framework as introductions to the video of this interview.

 

Date- November 18th at noon MT

Speakers- Nicholas Ward, Jay Otto and Brandon Scott will be available for questions

This webinar will summarizes a project funded through a cooperative agreement with NHTSA. The purpose of this project was to understand the beliefs shared amongst road users that encourage risky behaviors (“traffic safety culture”).  This study examined the beliefs that predict driving under the influence of cannabis (DUIC) with a national sample. The results indicate that relevant beliefs can be reliably measured with an online survey and that a model of traffic safety culture can predict DUIC behavior. By understanding which beliefs are most influential, we can develop effective strategies to reduce DUIC.

Date- Friday, 9/24 at 10 am PT / 11 am MT / Noon CT / 1 pm ET
Presented by Jay Otto

Distracted driving significantly contributes to motor vehicle crashes. Distractions are anything that takes a driver’s eyes off the road, hands off the wheel or mind off driving, like using a cell phone, adjusting music, or even reaching for an object. Relationships between family members or between supervisors and employees provide opportunities to reduce distracted driving.

This webinar summarizes the findings of a project sponsored by the Transportation Pooled Fund on Traffic Safety Culture (lead by the Montana Department of Transportation) that used surveys among parents with teens who were driving and supervisors who supervised employees who drove for work to better understand their beliefs about distracted driving and about establishing (or clarifying) expectations and rules about distracted driving. Resources developed included two documents to promote conversations (within families and workplaces) to promote engaged driving and supportive documents to promote the use of the resources.

Date- Wednesday, September 8, 2021 11:00 am Mountain Daylight Time
Presented by Jay Otto

Two psychological phenomena, psychological reactance and moral disengagement, may influence the decisions of individuals who engage in risky behaviors like not using a seat belt and aggressive driving. Psychological reactance is when people push back if they experience a threat to or loss of their freedom. Moral disengagement occurs when individuals stop using their self-regulatory processes and behave in ways that run counter to their normal standards.

This webinar summarizes the findings of a project sponsored by the Transportation Pooled Fund on Traffic Safety Culture (lead by the Montana Department of Transportation) which explored whether psychological reactance or moral disengagement is more prevalent among adult drivers who never or rarely wear their seat belts or who drive aggressively (i.e., speed, follow too closely, and pass excessively) and to identify potential messaging to minimize reactance and overcome moral disengagement regarding seat belt use and aggressive driving. Supportive materials developed included two information sheets, one message brief, presentation slides, and a summary poster.

Date: June 17, 2021 from 10-11:30 PT
Speakers: Dr. Kari Finley, Center for Health and Safety Culture and Shelly Baldwin, Director Washington Traffic Safety Commission

Proactive traffic safety is proactive behaviors demonstrating commitment to a safe roadway transportation system. These proactive behaviors demonstrate a commitment to safety beyond oneself to include the safety of the broader transportation system.   Dr. Kari Finley with the Center for Health and Safety Culture will lead a workshop to explore what proactive traffic safety is, how it can be applied to address specific behaviors, and tools that are available to support proactive traffic safety efforts to create lasting and sustainable improvements in traffic safety behaviors. Proactive traffic safety is proactive behaviors demonstrating commitment to a safe roadway transportation system. These proactive behaviors demonstrate a commitment to safety beyond oneself to include the safety of the broader transportation system.   Dr. Kari Finley with the Center for Health and Safety Culture will lead a workshop to explore what proactive traffic safety is, how it can be applied to address specific behaviors, and tools that are available to support proactive traffic safety efforts to create lasting and sustainable improvements in traffic safety behaviors.

According to the Federal Highway Administration (FHWA), a strong safety culture provides the foundation for reaching zero traffic deaths and advancing the safe system approach. Traffic Safety Culture focuses on how social factors in a community's culture influence how people prioritize and accept traffic safety strategies. In this video Shelly Baldwin who is the Director Washington Traffic Safety Commission (WTSC) discusses how her organization is changing their culture and approach to traffic safety.

This video was part of a workshop about “proactive safety culture” hosted by the Center for Health and Safety Culture. Proactive traffic safety is proactive behaviors demonstrating commitment to a safe roadway transportation system. These proactive behaviors demonstrate a commitment to safety beyond oneself to include the safety of the broader transportation system.

Dates: June 3, 2021 from 1 pm PT
Speakers: Jay Otto, Principal Scientist

Transforming culture in workplaces, schools, and communities to improve traffic safety is a complex challenge. Jay Otto, Principal Scientist with the Center for Health and Safety Culture, will lead a workshop sharing three lessons the Center has learned over the past 20 years of working collaboratively to transform culture and address complex health- and safety-related issues like traffic safety. Understanding these lessons guides more effective communication, fosters greater engagement, and ultimately leads to greater effectiveness in addressing the complex, adaptive challenges of health and safety.

A Webinar on Guidance for Evaluating Traffic Safety Culture Strategies

Dates: March 22 at 10 am PT, 11 am MT, Noon CT, 1 pm ET

To reach zero fatalities and serious injuries on our roadways, innovative strategies are needed such as those that can change traffic safety culture. Developing innovative strategies requires effective evaluation.

This webinar summarizes the findings of a project sponsored by the Transportation Pooled Fund on Traffic Safety Culture (lead by the Montana Department of Transportation) which reviewed best practices for evaluating strategies to change culture. During the webinar, we will review the findings from published literature and summarize guidance for evaluating culture-based strategies. We will share an important idea called “evaluative thinking” and how all stakeholders can contribute to evaluation. A guidance document on evaluation will be briefly reviewed.

Raising Safe Drivers – Parental Behaviors and Beliefs About Their Children Learning to Drive

Dates: January 28th at 11 am PT, noon MT, 1 pm CT, 2 pm ET
Speakers: Annmarie McMahill and Jay Otto

Motor vehicle crashes are the leading cause of death for teenagers in the U.S., according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Crash risk is particularly high immediately after one gets a driver’s license. Bolstering the engagement of parents and those in a parenting role to better prepare young people to drive may be an effective strategy to improve traffic safety for young drivers.

This webinar reviews the findings of a survey developed by the Center for Health and Safety Culture on behalf of the Washington Traffic Safety Commission about the beliefs and behaviors of 800 parents in Washington State relating to actions they take to teach their children safe driving practices.

The results focus on five key behaviors parents can take with children ages 5 and older: getting their child to think about various traffic safety issues, teaching their child about safe practices, allowing their child to practice their thinking, supporting their child as they learn, and recognizing their child’s effort.

Overall, parents were concerned about their child learning to drive safely, and many (79%) were interested in having access to resources that would help them engage in conversations about safe driving practices with their children.

COVID-19: Cultural Factors Influencing Wearing a Mask and Getting a Vaccine

Dates: Dec. 16, 12:00 MST
Speaker: Dr. Kari Finley

This webinar will discuss the results of a recent survey of over 1000 adults across the U.S. to understand key beliefs influencing people’s decisions to wear a mask in public spaces and get a vaccine to prevent COVID-19. The study results suggest there are opportunities to grow these behaviors to prevent COVID-19 by growing protective beliefs, bolstering perceived norms, growing perceptions of support, and correcting misperceptions. The survey also focused on sources people trust for getting information about COVID-19. The study results suggest that using trusted sources for sharing information about COVID-19 is an important consideration when making decisions about ways to deliver messages to change beliefs.

This information could be helpful to you as you make decisions about ways to bolster mask wearing. And as we get closer to having a COVID-19 vaccine available, there are opportunities to start preparing the public to be more accepting of a vaccine and overcome misperceptions that were revealed in the survey.

Three Lessons to Facilitate Transforming Health and Safety Culture

June 2020
Transforming culture in workplaces, schools, and communities to improve health and safety is a complex challenge. Jay Otto, Principal Scientist with the Center for Health and Safety Culture, will lead a webinar sharing three lessons the Center has learned over the past 20 years of working collaboratively to transform culture and address complex health- and safety-related issues like traffic safety, the misuse of substances, and violence (including child maltreatment). Understanding these lessons guides more effective communication, fosters greater engagement, and ultimately leads to greater effectiveness in addressing the complex, adaptive challenges of health and safety.

Together for Life Utah: Reducing Disparities Between Urban and Rural Seat Belt Use Rates

April 2020

In 2013, the Highway Safety Office of the Utah Department of Public Safety engaged the Center for Health and Safety Culture in a multi-year pilot project to reduce the significant disparities in seat belt use rates between Utah’s urban areas (with observed seat belt use rates at about 85%) and rural areas (with observed seat belt use rates as low as 55%). This webinar explained how the Together for Life Project promoted seat belt use in 7 rural counties by bolstering family rules, workplace rules, and bystander engagement (i.e., getting individuals to ask others to wear a seat belt) to increase both self-reported and observed seat belt use.