Upcoming Webinars

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Webinar Archives

To view all webinars, select the drop-down arrow on top right of below video or visit our YouTube channel

 

Workshop on Three Lessons to Support Growing a Positive Traffic Safety Culture

Transforming culture in workplaces, schools, and communities to improve traffic safety is a complex challenge. Jay Otto, Principal Scientist with the Center for Health and Safety Culture, will lead a workshop sharing three lessons the Center has learned over the past 20 years of working collaboratively to transform culture and address complex health- and safety-related issues like traffic safety. Understanding these lessons guides more effective communication, fosters greater engagement, and ultimately leads to greater effectiveness in addressing the complex, adaptive challenges of health and safety.

Three Lessons to Support Growing a Traffic Safety Culture Handouts 


 

A Webinar on Guidance for Evaluating Traffic Safety Culture Strategies

March 22 at 10 am PT, 11 am MT, Noon CT, 1 pm ET

To reach zero fatalities and serious injuries on our roadways, innovative strategies are needed such as those that can change traffic safety culture. Developing innovative strategies requires effective evaluation.

This webinar summarizes the findings of a project sponsored by the Transportation Pooled Fund on Traffic Safety Culture (lead by the Montana Department of Transportation) which reviewed best practices for evaluating strategies to change culture. During the webinar, we will review the findings from published literature and summarize guidance for evaluating culture-based strategies. We will share an important idea called “evaluative thinking” and how all stakeholders can contribute to evaluation. A guidance document on evaluation will be briefly reviewed.


 

 

Raising Safe Drivers – Parental Behaviors and Beliefs About Their Children Learning to Drive

January 28th at 11 am PT, noon MT, 1 pm CT, 2 pm ET

Speakers: Annmarie McMahill and Jay Otto

Motor vehicle crashes are the leading cause of death for teenagers in the U.S., according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Crash risk is particularly high immediately after one gets a driver’s license. Bolstering the engagement of parents and those in a parenting role to better prepare young people to drive may be an effective strategy to improve traffic safety for young drivers.

This webinar reviews the findings of a survey developed by the Center for Health and Safety Culture on behalf of the Washington Traffic Safety Commission about the beliefs and behaviors of 800 parents in Washington State relating to actions they take to teach their children safe driving practices.

The results focus on five key behaviors parents can take with children ages 5 and older: getting their child to think about various traffic safety issues, teaching their child about safe practices, allowing their child to practice their thinking, supporting their child as they learn, and recognizing their child’s effort.

Overall, parents were concerned about their child learning to drive safely, and many (79%) were interested in having access to resources that would help them engage in conversations about safe driving practices with their children.

WA-TSC Parent Survey KFR

Raising Safe Drivers – Parental Behaviors and Beliefs About Their Children Learning to Drive Slides

 

 


 

 

COVID-19: Cultural Factors Influencing Wearing a Mask and Getting a Vaccine

Dec. 16, 12:00 MST

Speaker: Dr. Kari Finley

This webinar will discuss the results of a recent survey of over 1000 adults across the U.S. to understand key beliefs influencing people’s decisions to wear a mask in public spaces and get a vaccine to prevent COVID-19. The study results suggest there are opportunities to grow these behaviors to prevent COVID-19 by growing protective beliefs, bolstering perceived norms, growing perceptions of support, and correcting misperceptions. The survey also focused on sources people trust for getting information about COVID-19. The study results suggest that using trusted sources for sharing information about COVID-19 is an important consideration when making decisions about ways to deliver messages to change beliefs. 

This information could be helpful to you as you make decisions about ways to bolster mask wearing. And as we get closer to having a COVID-19 vaccine available, there are opportunities to start preparing the public to be more accepting of a vaccine and overcome misperceptions that were revealed in the survey. 


COVID – Key Findings Report

 


 
 

Three Lessons to Facilitate Transforming Health and Safety Culture

June 2020
Transforming culture in workplaces, schools, and communities to improve health and safety is a complex challenge. Jay Otto, Principal Scientist with the Center for Health and Safety Culture, will lead a webinar sharing three lessons the Center has learned over the past 20 years of working collaboratively to transform culture and address complex health- and safety-related issues like traffic safety, the misuse of substances, and violence (including child maltreatment). Understanding these lessons guides more effective communication, fosters greater engagement, and ultimately leads to greater effectiveness in addressing the complex, adaptive challenges of health and safety.


 

Together for Life Utah: Reducing Disparities Between Urban and Rural Seat Belt Use Rates

April 2020

In 2013, the Highway Safety Office of the Utah Department of Public Safety engaged the Center for Health and Safety Culture in a multi-year pilot project to reduce the significant disparities in seat belt use rates between Utah’s urban areas (with observed seat belt use rates at about 85%) and rural areas (with observed seat belt use rates as low as 55%). This webinar explained how the Together for Life Project promoted seat belt use in 7 rural counties by bolstering family rules, workplace rules, and bystander engagement (i.e., getting individuals to ask others to wear a seat belt) to increase both self-reported and observed seat belt use.


Traffic Safety Culture Messaging

March 2020
This webinar featured information on the design of effective traffic safety messages based on an understanding of traffic safety culture. The webinar summarized different forms of traffic safety culture message including social norms. The webinar also discussed the importance of the message “frame” to be positive (rather than fear-based); namely, those that grow self-efficacy and align with audience values. Finally, the webinar discussed some aspects of message design to overcome audience resistance. Together, traffic safety culture messages can be more effective in changing behavior and be more acceptable to audience communities.More information and the webinar recording can be found here https://ruralsafetycenter.org/resources/list/traffic-safety-culture-messaging/


 

The Center for Health and Safety Culture: Who We Are and How We Support Efforts to Improve Health and Safety

March 2020

This webinar introduced the Center for Health and Safety Culture, our diverse staff, the Positive Culture Framework for improving health and safety, and the multitude of services offered to support communities and organizations in their efforts to transform culture. At the Center, we understand the challenges of cultural transformation and use the latest science to address complex social issues to improve health and safety in a sustainable way. The webinar reviewed the organization’s logic model, framework, and what we can do to help your organization and community reach their health and safety goals.

Watch Webinar – Who We Are


Applying Traffic Safety Culture – Sharing Survey Data about the Culture of Impaired Driving in Park Rapids, Minnesota

February 2020

Surveys were conducted to better understand the culture (values, attitudes, beliefs, and behaviors) of impaired driving among community adults, students, law enforcement, and workplaces in Park Rapids, Minnesota. This webinar reviewed the data and the discussed next steps for the Applying Traffic Safety Culture Project in Minnesota.

Watch Webinar – Applying Traffic Safety Culture


Traffic Safety Culture and Its Relationship to Vision Zero

December 2019 

There is growing interest in “traffic safety culture” (TSC) as a key factor to manage and sustain safe roadway transportation systems, especially as more jurisdictions adopt targets of zero traffic fatalities and serious injuries. However, the theory, terminology, and methods involved in addressing TSC come from human and social science disciplines that are not always familiar to traffic safety agencies (e.g., departments of transportation, driver’s licensing, motor vehicle records, etc.). The lack of shared language and understanding about TSC limits the ability of agencies to explore this topic and engage new stakeholders. Additionally, the variation in the interpretation and implementation of TSC strategies has resulted in a lack of consensus about best practices. Communication tools that develop shared language and understanding about TSC and its relationship to vision zero goals are needed. This webinar summarized the TSC Primer and its supporting toolkit that have been developed to address this need as part of a multi-state pooled fund project.

Watch Webinar – Traffic Safety Culture and Its Relationship to Vision Zero


Proactive Traffic Safety – Communication Tools to Reach Our Shared Vision of Zero Deaths and Serious Injuries

November 2019

In this webinar, Dr. Kari Finley introduced a variety of communication tools that can be implemented immediately to build the capacity of critical stakeholders to grow proactive traffic safety. Proactive traffic safety is proactive behaviors demonstrating commitment to a safe roadway transportation system. Examples of proactive behaviors include: supporting existing traffic safety efforts, planning a safe way to get home before driving alcohol, speaking up about other people’s unsafe behaviors like driving distracted, establishing family rules like never texting while driving, and establishing workplace policies like always wearing a seat belt in a company vehicle.

Watch Webinar – Proactive Traffic Safety – Communication Tools to Reach Our Shared Vision of Zero Deaths and Serious Injuries


Key Information for Driving Under the Influence of Cannabis (DUIC) Policy

November 2019

This webinar explored key information for driving under the influence of cannabis (DUIC) policy. There is growing concern about DUIC, especially as more states change laws around cannabis possession and use. This concern is often exacerbated by the inconsistency and inaccessibility of key information regarding the role of cannabis in crash risk. To rectify this situation, a synthesis project was conducted to capture the key information for the critical issues that affect policy decisions with DUIC. The synthesis project included the creation of tools to help communicate this information among stakeholders to support and inform rational policy making. This research project was sponsored by the Traffic Safety Culture Pooled Fund Program hosted by the Montana Department of Transportation. For more information on the research project, please visit https://www.mdt.mt.gov/research/projects/trafficsafety-duic.shtml.

Watch Webinar – Key Information for Driving Under the Influence of Cannabis Policy


Reducing Problem Gambling in Oregon

August 2019

This webinar showcased the Oregon Problem Gambling Prevention Project – a partnership between the Center for Health and Safety Culture and the Oregon Health Authority. This 2.5-year project focused on reducing problem gambling throughout Oregon. As part of the project, a toolkit of resources was developed to support county wide prevention professionals in their efforts to prevent problem gambling among adults and youth. This webinar provided an overview of an assessment to measure beliefs and behaviors related to problem gambling, as well as attitudes toward the development of guidelines for gambling responsibly. It explored how the partnership formed, the tools that were developed, and how they tools are being used to reduce problem gambling across the state.

Watch Webinar – Reducing Problem Gambling in Oregon


Exploring Law Enforcement Attitudes and Beliefs about Traffic Safety Enforcement

July 2019

This webinar summarized the results of a project to better understand how the culture within law enforcement agencies impacts engagement in traffic safety enforcement. Specifically, we examined (1) how law enforcement leaders and officers prioritize traffic safety relative to other public safety issues; (2) self-reported attitudes, beliefs, and behaviors about traffic safety enforcement activities; (3) law enforcement’s perceptions of how traffic safety enforcement behaviors have changed in recent years; and (4) how prioritization of traffic safety attitudes, beliefs, enforcement behaviors, and perceptions of change vary between leaders and officers, agency types, and urban and rural settings. This project was sponsored by the Traffic Safety Culture Pooled Fund Program hosted by the Montana Department of Transportation.

What is the Positive Culture Framework for Improving Health and Safety?

June 2019

This webinar provided an overview of the Positive Culture Framework, a way of organizing efforts to improve health and safety. It began by discussing how aspects of our culture impact the behaviors we’re addressing and how working across the social ecology can transform our approach and sustain our efforts. It introduced the Positive Culture Framework and discussed how it takes an appreciative approach and seeks to grow the positive aspects of our culture in an effort to improve health and safety and reduce risky behaviors. The Framework provides a 7-step process (the what) for engaging in this work, key skills to increase effectiveness (the how), and the context (the where) we will do the work. 

Watch Webinar – What is the Positive Culture Framework for Improving Health and Safety?

View Presentation Slides for What is PCF Webinar (PDF)


Traffic Safety Culture: Review of Phase 1 Accomplishments and an Invitation to Join Phase 2 of this Pooled Fund Program

May 2019

In 2014, the Montana Department of Transportation (MDT) initiated a five-year transportation pooled fund program on traffic safety culture, partnering with the Center for Health and Safety Culture (CHSC) at Montana State University as the principal research entity. This program began as a cooperative effort among participating state DOTs and other (traditional and non-traditional) stakeholder organizations sharing a vested interest in the role of traffic safety culture to achieve the Toward Zero Deaths (TZD) vision. The pooled fund members decided to continue another five-year cycle to begin October 1, 2019. This webinar introduced the pooled fund program to state DOTs and other traffic safety stakeholders interested more information or wishing to participate in the new funding cycle. 

Learn More About Pooled Fund Program

Watch Webinar – Traffic Safety Culture: Review of Phase 1 Accomplishments and an Invitation to Join Phase 2 of this Pooled Fund Program


Traffic Safety Culture and Driving Under the Influence of Cannabis and Alcohol in Washington State

February 2019

The Center for Health and Safety Culture partnered with the Washington Traffic Safety Commission (WTSC) in support of their Target Zero goal by exploring the traffic safety culture underlying the increase in fatal crashes related to drivers using cannabis and alcohol. This webinar will present an overview of the methodology and key findings as well as discuss the suggested strategies and tools that were developed to help WTSC make effective use of the results from this project.
Watch Webinar – Traffic Safety Culture and Driving Under the Influence of Cannabis and Alcohol in Washington Stat


Moving Beyond Bystander Engagement: Growing Citizenship to Improve Health and Safety

February 2019This webinar introduced safety citizenship, which seeks to involve the majority of people engaging in safe behaviors to influence the smaller group engaging in risky behaviors. Safety citizenship requires creating a culture that values “our safety” and empowers early identification of potential risk, being proactive, and bystander engagement.
Watch Webinar – Moving Beyond Bystander Engagement: Growing Citizenship to Improve Health and Safety


Communication: A Catalyst for Growing Positive Culture

January 2019

This webinar engages participants in developing a deeper understanding of how communication can be used as a catalyst to improve health and safety. Communication includes a variety of methods ranging from mass media campaigns to leveraging the power of individual voices.
Watch Webinar – Communication: A Catalyst for Growing Positive Culture

Reducing Underage Drinking with Practical Tools that Develop Social and Emotional Skills 

December 2018
A recent study found that Montana parents with higher social and emotional parenting skills were over six times more likely to engage in best 
practices to reduce underage drinking. This webinar will review social and emotional skills, how they are protective for youth, and a project creating practical tools for parents to reduce underage drinking and strengthen social and emotional skills.
Watch Webinar – Reducing Underage Drinking with Practical Tools that Develop Social and Emotional Skills
Download Handout


Psychological Reactance and Communication

November 2018

Psychological reactance is a negative reaction triggered by a perception that something or someone is impinging on an individual’s freedom and autonomy. Psychological reactance can impede efforts to improve health and safety on a wide variety of issues including traffic safety (“don’t tell me to wear a seat belt”), prevention (“don’t tell me how to raise my children”), and violence (“don’t take my guns if I have been violent”). During this session, we will introduce the concept and ways to quiet the negative response.

Watch Webinar – Psychological Reactance and Communication


Leadership Skills to Improve Health & Safety

October 2018
Improving health and safety and transforming culture are acts of leadership. But what leadership skills are necessary to support and sustain effective actions? This free webinar will explore different leadership skills that are important to cultural transformation applicable to a variety of settings.
Watch Webinar – Leadership Skills to Improve Health & Safety


Engaging Workplaces to Improve Health and Safety

October 2018

Often, efforts to improve health and safety focus on reaching children in schools. While this strategy is important, it neglects the need to address the behaviors of adults. Workplaces provide an important opportunity to engage adults about health and safety behaviors. We will explore definitions for healthy workplaces, the evidence base for workplace interventions, and future opportunities as to how workplaces could expand our portfolio of strategies to improve health and safety.
Watch Webinar – Engaging Workplaces to Improve Health and Safety


What is the Positive Culture Framework?

May 2018

The Positive Culture Framework (PCF) is the Center’s approach to improving health and safety in communities and organizations based on our latest research. The approach seeks to cultivate health and safety by providing detailed steps and addressing leadership, communication, and integration skills to successfully navigate the process. PCF builds on the recognition that the solutions are in the community. Join CHSC Principal Scientist, Jay Otto, M.S., in this webinar to learn more about our Positive Culture Framework and how it works.

Watch Webinar – What is the Positive Culture Framework?


The Science of Stigma: What We Know About Stigma & What We Can Do To Address It

April 2018

Have you ever wondered: Why do some conditions get stigmatized and others don’t? How is stigma manifested? What perpetuates stigma? What can I do to reduce the negative impact of stigma? The Center has been exploring stigma and how stigma is associated with a variety of negative social and health outcomes. Researchers of stigma commonly differentiate between three levels of stigma: public or societal stigma, personal or self-stigma, and structural stigma. Understanding stigma at these interconnected levels can help researchers and stakeholders to identify targeted anti-stigma efforts across the social ecology. In this webinar, Dr. Kari Finley discusses how stigma negatively influences a variety of health conditions and how we can reduce stigma in our work to improve health and safety.

Watch Webinar – The Science of Stigma: What We Know About Stigma & What We Can Do To Address It


Positive Culture Framework Overview

February 2018

The Positive Culture Framework (PCF) is an approach based on our latest research about improving health and safety in our communities and organizations. PCF seeks to cultivate health and safety. We intentionally use the word “cultivate” because PCF builds on shared values, beliefs, and attitudes that already exist in a culture to promote health and safety. PCF builds on the recognition that the solutions are in the community. This video will introduce how the Positive Culture Framework process can be used to address any public health or safety issue by building on the shared values, beliefs, and attitudes that already exist in a culture.

Watch Webinar – Positive Culture Framework Overview


Leadership, Communication, and Integration Skills

February 2018

In this webinar we give an overview on three prevention skills that are essential to the Positive Culture Framework. Improving our skills helps us be more effective in our prevention efforts. These critical skills include prevention leadership, communication, and the integration of prevention strategies. Strong leaders create conditions where people choose to be healthier and safer.  Communication helps us correct misperceptions, address cultural factors, and tell a new story about our community. Integration of our efforts seeks to align and leverage strategies for greater impact. 
Watch Webinar – Leadership, Communication, and Integration Skills


Social Norms Communications Campaigns

December 2017

In this communication skills webinar, you will learn to utilize social norms theory for behavior change. As a part of this webinar, participants will learn best practices for social norms marketing campaigns, including a simplified behavior model and a seven step process for developing effective communication. Participants will leave the webinar with a better understanding of what is required to implement an effective campaign in their community on a variety of topic areas.

Watch Webinar – Social Norms Communications Campaigns


Laws, Policies, and Rules – How Do They Change Behavior?

October 2017 

We know that laws, policies, and rules are powerful tools to improve health and safety. But how do they really work? How do they change behavior? During this webinar, we will explore ideas about how laws, policies, and rules impact behavior. We will discuss how this understanding can inform our communications, can encourage more conversations, and even promote bystander engagement.
Watch Webinar – Laws, Policies, and Rules – How Do They Change Behavior?


Dating Violence Survey Results

May 2017

Intimate partner violence is a major health concern. The National Intimate Partner and Sexual Violence Survey conducted in 2010 found that more than 1 in 3 women (36%) and more than 1 in 4 men (29%) in the United States have experienced rape, physical violence, and/or stalking by an intimate partner in their lifetimes.1 The 2015 Youth Risk Behavior Survey reported that 10% of high school students (12% of females, 7% of males) experienced physical dating violence in the past 12 months, and 16% of females and 5% of males experienced sexual dating violence.
Watch Webinar – Dating Violence Survey Results


Traffic Safety Citizenship

February 2017

Traffic safety citizenship is a novel approach to empower the vast majority of safe road users to engage in prosocial behaviors to impact the smaller group engaging in risky behaviors.  Learn more about this approach and strategies that you can use increase traffic safety citizenship.
Watch Webinar – Traffic Safety Citizenship


Drug-Free Communities Writing Proposal

January 2017 

Applying for a Fiscal Year 2017 Drug-Free Communities (DFC) grant? Watch this webinar to explore how to structure your application and organize your efforts to accomplish the two DFC program goals of establishing and strengthening collaboration around prevention and reducing substance use among youth. This webinar will highlight how the Positive Culture Framework can be utilized to organize your application, meet the requirements of DFC Support Program, and enhance your coalition’s efforts.
Watch Webinar – Drug-Free Communities Writing Proposal

Download the DFC Handout


Driving Under the Influence of Cannabis

December 2016

The Center for Health and Safety Culture completed a research project with the Transportation Pooled Fund on Traffic Safety Culture. The purpose of this research project was to understand which specific aspects of traffic safety culture predict the decision to drive under the influence of cannabis (DUIC). As more states decriminalize and legalize medical and recreational use of cannabis (marijuana), traffic safety leaders and public health advocates have growing concerns about DUIC. The results of this project help distinguish differences in culture between users and non-users of cannabis regarding traffic safety as well as provide recommendations for next steps.
Watch Webinar – Driving Under the Influence of Cannabis


What is Guide Service?

August 2016

How can Guide Service help you improve health and safety in your community?  In this webinar, you will learn how support from the Center for Health and Safety Culture (CHSC) can contribute to your communities’ successes. A Guide from the CHSC is a personal consultant available by phone and email to support your community’s efforts. Through monthly calls, the Guide becomes familiar with your specific project and helps guide you through the transformation process. The Guide is available to provide feedback on leadership development, implementing communication efforts, and managing prevention strategies at the local level.
Watch Webinar – What is Guide Service?


Challenges of Fear Based Approaches

August 2016

Fear appeals are persuasive messages that scare an audience into adopting a recommended response. Fear appeals are effective with many people, however we need to ask the question if there are any unintended consequences in our work. Research has shown that there are several negative consequences with fear based approaches. Watch this short webinar to learn more about the need create a sense of concern rather than fear to cultivate cultural change.

Watch Webinar – Challenges of Fear Based Approaches

 
 
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